The Causes of Heart Diseas

Heart disease affects so many people that it has become a serious concern for medical science. The heart is a complex organ that is vulnerable to hereditary as well as environmental risks. Scientists identified a number of risk factors associated with heart disease. They grouped these risk factors into major and minor causes.
Major causes are those that have been proven to increase your risk of heart disease. One of the major risk factors is high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke because the heart to work too hard and can damage arteries. Another major cause is high blood cholesterol levels. It is so dangerous because fatty deposits build up in blood vessels and make at greater risk of having a heart attack. Extra cholesterol enters the human body when they eat foods that come from animals (meats, eggs, and dairy products). The leading cause in this group is diabetes. The American Heart Association estimates that 65% of patients with diabetes die of some form of heart disease.
Minor causes are those that some doctor think can lead to an increased risk of heart disease, but their exact role has not been defined. The leader in this group is obesity. Extra weight and poor diet increases chances of developing other risk factors for heart disease, especially high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and diabetes. Next cause is having a sedentary lifestyle. Cubicle and home life on the couch is not conducive to health. Exercise burns calories, helps to control cholesterol levels and diabetes, and may lower blood pressure. Exercise also strengthens the heart muscle and makes the arteries more flexible. And third cause is having a Type A personality. It means the person becoming easily stressed, being overly competitive, aggressive, and intense. Stressful situations raise heart rate and blood pressure.
It is never too late or too early begins improving heart health. Some risk factors can be controlled, while others cannot. But, by eliminating risk factors that can change and by properly managing those that cannot control, may greatly reduce risk of heart disease.